RADIO AND TV

These in-depth radio and television feature stories air on Arizona Public Media, Southern Arizona's NPR and PBS affiliates (NPR 89.1/FM and PBS Channel 6) 

 

From March to Movement After the march, everyone takes their signs and goes home. Then what? How does a march turn into a movement?

 

After the Bomb Scare  How safe do Jews feel in Tucson?

Infinite Lifetimes Renowned Buddhist scholar Robert Thurman, translator of the "Tibetan Book of the Dead", talks about rebirth, space aliens, and lucid dying.

 

Taking Back the Night in a Year of #MeToo Ripples from the national movement were felt at an annual Tucson event, where hundreds marched to end sexual violence.

 

Fighting Hate with Love  An Interview with Civil Rights Pioneer Bernard Lafayette

Feeding Our Future A nine-part series, featuring stories of the innovative work being done to feed families, promote health and food security, prepare for climate change, and create pathways out of poverty.

Moving Students Forward: A Community Interactive on Education Arizona trails nearly every state in the nation when it comes to education. This 90-minute interactive event produced by Laura Markowitz was live-streamed and taped for broadcast on Arizona Public Media. Experts on systems change in education came together to discuss a new way Tucson can make a collective impact on education.

Who Pays for the All Souls Procession? The annual Tucson community ritual will attract more than 100,000 participants and spectators on November 9th. But despite its phenomenal growth and 25-year history, it still runs at a deficit.

Colossal Cave Mountain Park After 52 years managing Colossal Cave, director Martie Maierhauser's future at the Tucson landmark is uncertain. 

Juneteenth  June 19, also called “Juneteenth,” marks the day when the last slaves in the United States were freed.  Organizers of Tucson's celebration this year say the holiday is not just for African Americans.

Valley of the Moon  After 90 years, this fantasy garden park is still an oasis for children of all ages who believe in fairies and imagination.

Harvesting Cholla Buds  The prickliest plant of the Sonoran Desert is full of nutritious buds, if you can figure out how to safely harvest and prepare them. Ethnobotanist Martha Ames Burgess takes a group into the desert to teach them the Tohono O'odham ways of the harvest.

Tales of Tucson is a series of original radio dramas inspired by the myths, legends and magic of the Sonoran Southwest, co-written and co-produced by award-winning writers Laura Markowitz and John Vornholt. TALES OF TUCSON was launched on NPR 89.1/FM and is currently hosted on KXCI 91.3/FM, Tucson's community radio station.

Murder Mayhem  Go behind the scenes of a Tucson mystery dinner theater group to find out what makes this dramatic art form so popular. Laura Markowitz talks to the director and writer, and a theater expert about audience-participation theater.

The Emergence of Trans-poetics Laura Markowitz interviews transgender poets Joy Ladin and TC Tolbert to find out how language can help people understand the experiences of being and becoming.

Stalking the Wild Rhubarb The Sonoran Desert abounds with a rich variety of foods if you know where, and when, to look. Laura Markowitz goes hunting for wild rhubarb in Aravaipa Canyon with ethno-botanist Martha Ames Burgess.

The Controversy Over Cannabis -- In this special week-long series, Laura Markowitz talks to pro-cannabis activists, historians, law enforcement agents, medical marijuana patients, child welfare advocates and drug addiction specialists to explore our contradictory views about marijuana. Click below to listen to all five segments.

     The Enduring Mystique of Marijuana

     Marijuana: To Ban or Not to Ban

     Who Oversees a Secret Garden?

     The Violent Roots of Marijuana

     Marijuana's Effects on the Brain

To Build a Village  A Patagonia woman is hoping to rebuild Haiti using the environmentally sustainable principles of Permaculture.

Restoring Miracle Mile  After years of neglect, one of Tucson's historic roadways is experiencing renewal, thanks to local vision and hard work.

A Survivor's Story Holocaust survivor Bill Kugelman chooses to share his story of trauma and survival with Tucson's troubled youth because he hopes it will inspire them to make better choices.

Preventing Teen Sexual Abuse Laura Markowitz talks with a group of Rincon High School students who are working to prevent sexual violence among their peers and dispel the myths surrounding rape.

Salvaged Pages: An Interview with Alexandra Zapruder Laura Markowitz interviews the filmmaker and author about the diaries of Jewish youth who witnessed the horrors of the Holocaust

THEM: Images of Separation A traveling exhibit on loan from the Jim Crow Museum of Racist Memorabilia is on display for Black History Month at Chandler-Gilbert Community College. Laura Markowitz speaks with organizer Patrick Williams about why it's important to preserve artifacts of hate.

The Journey of Wastewater Find out what happens to more than 65 million gallons of drinking water that are flushed away every day in Pima County, as Laura Markowitz follows the flow.  (Link to Television version)

Downtown Redevelopment Architect Corky Poster talks with Laura Markowitz about why the redevelopment plans for downtown Tucson always seem to take two steps backward for every step forward.

Downtown Master Plans  Laura Markowitz tells us about some of the plans for downtown Tucson that have been hatched over the last 100 years, from a ten-million-gallon-hat Wild West museum to a Greek amphitheater.  

Preserving Native Plants Laura Markowitz tells us how The Tucson Herbalist Collective is preserving the ecological heritage of the Sonoran Desert and helping others to put native edible and medicinal plants to use.  

Raw Food Diet for Diabetics While doctors say there is no cure for diabetes, some diabetics have discovered a way to stay off insulin---permanently. Laura Markowitz reports that it's all about what they eat.  (Link to Television version)

Road-Building Laura Markowitz explores the ingenuity that has gone into the biggest transportation construction project in Arizona history---the widening of I-10.

Premonitions Physician and author Dr. Larry Dossey tells Laura Markowitz how glimpses of the future can change our understanding of time and human consciousness.

Bernard Lafayette June 19th is Juneteenth, a commemoration of the announcement of the end of slavery. Laura Markowitz brings us a conversation with civil rights pioneer Dr. Bernard LaFayette.

Traces of the Trade Laura Markowitz brings us the story of the Rhode Island family that ran the most extensive slave-trading operation in U.S. history, and their descendants today who are trying to come to terms with their ancestors' racism, and their own.

Ellie Towne A crime-ridden neighborhood on Tucson's west side was transformed  into an All-American City, and much of the credit goes to a retiree and volunteer community activist named Ellie Towne. Laura Markowitz takes us on a tour of the Flowing Wells Revitalization Area and brings us Towne's remarkable story.

An Interview with NPR's Cokie Roberts  Laura Markowitz talks with NPR senior news analyst Cokie Roberts about her book "We Are Our Mother's Daughters", chronicling the legacies of bold American women.

The Living Library  Laura Markowitz describes how this innovative project is helping Tucsonans embrace diversity.

Audio Postcard The Sonoran Desert Weed Whackers' ongoing battle against buffelgrass. Laura Markowitz reports.

Extra-Terrestrial Life? Laura Markowitz talks with University of Arizona astronomer Chris Impey about the science of astrobiology, and the ongoing search for signs of alien life.

Arts and the Economy Some local artists are using their creativity to to keep the arts alive during tough economic times, and that's attracting the interest of the Tucson City Council. Laura Markowitz talks to leaders of the arts community and grassroots activists.

Women's Commission Laura Markowitz investigates the role of men in women's rights organizations, and shares reactions from community members about the election of Michael Mandel as the first man to chair the Women's Commission.

Solar Energy  Solar energy is good for the environment, and it may also be good for the Tucson economy. Laura Markowitz reports on a training program for people who hope to become solar experts.